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Archbishop Sample

Archdiocesan Liturgical Handbook

Archdiocesan Liturgical Handbook

Dear Parishioners,

Recently, the Office for Divine Worship, under the leadership of Monsignor Gerard O’Connor, published a 350+ page document to guide parishes and their staff with the Liturgy. It is called the Archdiocesan Liturgical Handbook or ALH for short. It’s intent is “to serve as a guide to many of the aspects of the life of our diocese and our parishes that concern the celebration of the Sacred Liturgy and the understanding of the faith it expresses” (Archbishop Sample, ELH). It is intended to be a “living” document that will be updated over time as new situations arise. It includes “positions, policies, best practices, and particular norms for the Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon” (ibid.).

I have been reading this document and highlighting things which may apply to us. Some need more reflection while others don’t even apply to us. For those that do apply to us, I will be sharing those items in the weeks and months ahead. Our Liturgy Committee will also be reflecting on these things to evaluate our own liturgies and determine if any changes are needed.

The chapters of the ALH covers many things about the Mass and beyond. Here are some of the topics: The Archbishop, the priest, deacons, movement and posture, lay ministers, bread and wine, sacred objects and furnishings, music and singing, the parts of the Mass, Masses with the Archbishop, Sunday parish celebrations, reception of Holy Communion, reservation of the Blessed Sacrament including perpetual adoration, aspects related to the RCIA, Baptism of infants, the seven Sacraments, Funerals, Extraordinary Form of Mass, Liturgical year, popular pieties, eastern Christians, and special circumstances.

I have not heard or seen such a document prepared for a diocese. So, this is rather innovative.  I look forward to learning more and seeing where we find ourselves within the norms and guidelines of the ALH. In future bulletin letters, I will publish some of the texts that refer to things that most interest our community. And as always, I am open to your thoughts and constructive comments.

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

Liturgical Change, Pt. 2

Liturgical Change, Pt. 2

Dear Parishioners,

As part of the changes for our liturgical practice, Archbishop Sample wants to clarify the value of daily Mass and what we should be doing when there is no priest present to offer Mass.  Commonly, we have offered a communion service presided over by our deacon or, if he is unavailable, a trained layperson.  Since the Church has never given an official accommodation for such situations, our archbishop wants us to stop offering communion services in lieu of one of the other great liturgies of our Church, The Liturgy of the Hours, with adaptions for a more extensive use of Scripture from the day's official Scritpure readings.  Here's a more thorough reflection by Msgr. Gerard O'Connor, our Director of the office of Divine Worship:

The Most Holy Eucharist, “stands at the center of the Church's life”, since it truly “contains the Church’s entire spiritual wealth: Christ himself, our Passover and Living Bread.” “The Church has received the Eucharist from Christ her Lord not as one gift – however precious – among so many others, but as the gift par excellence, for it is the gift of himself, of his person in his sacred humanity, as well as the gift of his saving work.” That surpassing gift of the Eucharist is where the Church draws her life, the dynamic force of all her activity and her whole sense of purpose and direction. As the Second Vatican Council proclaimed, the Eucharistic sacrifice is “the source and summit of the Christian life”.

Any discussion of weekday liturgical worship must begin by recalling the importance and normative character of daily Mass in the life of every Catholic community. Pope Paul VI recommended that priests “worthily and devoutly offer Mass each day in order that both they and the rest of the faithful may enjoy the benefits that flow so richly from the sacrifice of the cross.”(Mysterium Fidei, 33) Pope John Paul II echoes these words in stating: “We can understand, then, how important it is for the spiritual life of the priest, as well as for the good of the Church and the world, that priests follow the Council’s recommendation to celebrate the Eucharist daily,” and he like many popes before him, states that "priests should be encouraged to celebrate Mass every day, even in the absence of a congregation, since it is an act of Christ and the Church”.

It is important to make the distinction between the celebration of Holy Mass and the reception of Holy Communion outside of Mass. It is clear that the Sacrifice of the Mass and the Sacrament of the Eucharist cannot be separated theologically and are only separated temporally due to pastoral necessity.

With regard to the separation of the Sacrifice and the Sacrament of the Eucharist, Pope Paul states: “The few things that we have touched upon concerning the Sacrifice of the Mass encourage us to say something about the Sacrament of the Eucharist, since both Sacrifice and Sacrament pertain to the same mystery and cannot be separated from each other. The Lord is immolated in an unbloody way in the Sacrifice of the Mass and He re-presents the sacrifice of the Cross and applies its salvific power at the moment when he becomes sacramentally present — through the words of consecration — as the spiritual food of the faithful, under the appearances of bread and wine.” (Mysterium Fidei, 34)

In the same encyclical Pope Paul makes a distinction between the celebration of Holy Mass and the reception of Holy Communion: “For such a Mass brings a rich and abundant treasure of special graces to help the priest himself, the faithful, the whole Church and the whole world toward salvation—and this same abundance of graces is not gained through mere reception of Holy Communion.” (Mysterium Fidei, 32)

It is the expectation of the Church that: “The faithful should normally receive sacramental Communion of the Eucharist during Mass itself, at the moment laid down by the rite of celebration, that is to say, just after the Priest celebrant’s Communion.” In fact the Second Vatican Council refers to it as the “more perfect form of participation in the Mass.” (Sacrosanctum Concilium, 55)

In order to promote this new practice, the office of Divine Worship has crafted a high quality booklet entitled, "Parish Weekday Prayer."  Here's a reflection from Msgr. O'Connor on this booklet:

Sometimes the faithful of a parish cannot be present at the Holy Eucharist during the week due to the absence ofa priest or excessive travel requirements. Whilst daily Mass is highly encouraged and considered ideal, sometimes it is not possible. In these circumstances the faithful are likewise encouraged to gather and pray together.

There are many prayers and devotions which are available to a group of the faithful gathered in the absence ofa priest; however the Liturgy ofthe Hours has pride ofplace since it is the 'Prayer of the Church'. The purpose of the Liturgy of the Hours is to sanctify the day and all human activity and this community prayer has a special dignity since Christ himself said: "Where two or three meet in my name, I shall be there with them" (Mt 18:20).'

This book of weekday prayer has been prepared to allow those gathered on the weekdays ofthe Church's year to pray together the Liturgy ofthe Hours in such a way as to incorporate the Sacred Scripture that would be provided during the Liturgy ofthe Word at Holy Mass.

By adapting the Liturgy of the Hours in such a way, the faithful can continue to follow the sequence of readings that are presented to the Church during the liturgical year. This integral reading of Sacred Scripture during the celebration of this adapted Liturgy ofthe Hours is approved by the Archbishop, only for this Parish Weekday Prayer in the Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon. Although this collection of Parish Weekday Prayer is envisioned to be celebrated in the morning it may also be used at other times of the day.

This change will take effect on June 3rd.  Click the following link to download this booklet: Parish Weekday Prayer

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

Mini-Campaign - Thank You - Church Dedication

Mini-Campaign - Thank You - Church Dedication

Dear Parishioners,

This past week, we held our annual min-campaign for the continuing process of our Honoring Our Past - Building Our Future Capital Campaign. This process will continue annually through five years. The goal is to steward our pledge sources so as to ensure the stability of the campaign while also attempting to make sure everyone has an opportunity to participate. We are very aware that each year there will be parishioners who move, have a reduction in pay or hours, lose a job, get sick, have an unexpected change in finances, and even pass away.  This can destabilize a percentage of pledges. On the other hand, each year new people move into the area and join our parish, others get a new job or a raise, others come into a new-found financial prosperity, and others have completed their pledge and desire to continue to help financially. It is for these and many other reasons why the campaign program calls for an annual process.  

So, I want to thank all of you who generously made a pledge or renewed your pledge this past week. I also want to thank the crew of dedicated parishioners who came each evening to the church and made phone calls to prospective donors.  If some folks didn’t make a pledge, it was still important to reach and let them know that they are an important part of our parish and that we truly appreciate all their prayerful support. 

This is an exciting time.  I called the office of the Archbishop and got a tentative date for Archbishop Sample to come and dedicate our new church.  At this time, we are looking to September 1st.  Pencil that date in our calendars, but be prepared with your handy eraser too. As the completion date gets closer, I will make sure to let us all know with more certainty the date and time for our first Mass and dedication.

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

The Common Good

Dear Parishioners,

The term, “Common Good,” is something that may be lost on many people and is too often being replaced with individual rights with no regard to anyone else.  This rugged individualism has been condemned by the Church.  We can ill afford to be silent about this issue which is at the base of many if not all social issues confronting our society today.  

In general, when the justification is used that a certain behavior doesn’t hurt anyone else, commonly such an argument reveals a myopic vision of the world and a lack of understanding of the consequences of our individual and even private actions.  We must more deeply grasp the effects we have on our relationships with others near to us as well as the larger community in which we live in order to understand the common good.  We are not an island.  To think and behave as if we are opens up the potential to great harm for all.  Here’s some examples which illustrate this point. 

Here’s a simple yet less controversial issue: When someone dies and they want their ashes scattered over a mountain or forest, everyone else is robbed of the ability to go to a burial place where they can mourn.  The deceased person’s wish negates the good of others who need to mourn.  It is also an undignified way to repose the former temple of a person who was made in God’s image.  This is not a viewpoint with the Common Good in mind, just the individual.

In the abortion debate, the individual right of the mother trumps the good of the child in the womb or even the right of the father who may disagree with the decision.  In this holocaustic viewpoint, countless millions have been killed in the name of an individual.  The fact that entire generations have been wiped out by a so-called right is clear evidence that it is against the dignity of the human person and the Common Good.

So-called, doctor assisted suicide arguments claim the individual’s right to end their own life on their terms so as to avoid suffering, autonomy, control, and the like, negating the use of effective palliative care and equating one’s value or dignity in terms of abilities or capacity.  It is a grievous act akin to murder (See The Gospel of Life., #66).  The legalization in Oregon of euthanasia, its true title, may justify its use in some people’s minds, but it is against the dignity of the human person and the Common Good.

The current movement to redefine marriage is based on the assumption that marriage is the simple desire and right of individuals to do what they want, regardless of the good of children and Divine law.  Marriage is not a right which just anyone can validly undertake even between heterosexual couples. I have processed all too many annulments which were granted on the grounds that they did not, and may never have, the capacity to live out the commitment that marriage demands. In these cases, the couple erroneously attempted to enter into the Sacrament which they could not do.  Marriage is a privileged state which God designed and which we have no authority to define or reinvent.  Anyone desiring to be married should send to prayer if they are capable and sufficiently prepared to undertake such an awesome Sacrament. Redefining marriage diminishes its sanctity and is against the Common Good.

A more current issue which is being placed before the voters this November 4th is the effort to legalize recreational use of marijuana.  Proponents of this movement commonly argue the right to do what they will with their own body.  However, this viewpoint does not consider the consequences to children and the safety of others. Archbishop Sample’s current column in the Catholic Sentinel fills this in well. The argument that it does not harm the user taking the drug is fallacious since the very act of getting “high” diminishes one’s abilities, distorts one’s senses, suppresses the immune system, decreases motivation, darkens the conscience, and ultimately damages the soul. The fact that marijuana may be easy to acquire or that it is being used by one’s family or friends, or even if it does become legal, does not change the fact that it is harmful to one’s body and soul as well as to our culture. It is against the common good.

With regard to the current ballot measure for offering drivers cards for those without a social security number, particularly immigrants who are our modern day neighbors, there needs to be  away to help them.  By offering a way for them to acquire a drivers card increases the number of people who are trained in driving and thus makes our roads safer.  Voting “yes” for this bill will create safer drivers.  Voting for this bill is for the Common Good.

So, we need to ponder more deeply than our own desires and wants.  We need to be on guard against our own desire for individualism.  As Catholic Christians, we need to consider the consequences of things in regard to the Common Good.  Such a frame of reference broadens our minds and allows us to make more ethical and moral choices.  It also gets us out of partisan thinking and voting.  It brings to the fore our faith before all other ideologies. Remember that we are Catholic Christians before all else. We need to pray to have the view of God who desires the good for all.

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

Merry Christmas

Dear Parishioners,

At this time of the year, it is good to recognize the Good News in our community. It is a time to look back with gratitude for all that God has done in our midst. It is a time for thankfulness and hope for the future.

For me, I look back on 2013 and see how the Year of Faith has helped us shore up our faith in the moral issues of our time. I give thanks for all who spent extra time to offer a daily Rosary, Fast on Friday’s, and attend our monthly Solemn Vespers with Adoration. I am also thankful for the concrete steps we’ve taken to begin the process of renovating our Church. We have a long way to go in the process, but we have a solid core committee who continue to discuss and explore ideas. I am also thankful for the work of Alan Crews who will be officially retiring as of this month. His joyful presence and work ethic has been inspirational for me, the staff, and parishioners who have worked with him. I am thankful for the arrival of John Becerra, our seminarian intern, who has added a view of hope for vocations to the priesthood. These are just some of the local happenings within our parish. But, there were some much broader events that also has effected the larger Church.

This past year we witnessed two major leadership changes in the Church, one locally and the other globally. First was the significant appointment of Archbishop Alexander Sample as our new Archbishop coupled with the retirement of Archbishop Vlazny. Then shortly after that, Pope Benedict XVI stunned the world by his humble resignation, thereby setting into motion a conclave which elected Pope Francis, the first Jesuit pope and the first pope to take a name in honor of St. Francis of Assisi. Instead of the common news cycle of criticism of the Church, it was refreshing to hear and watch reports of these events set in a positive light. Since then, Pope Francis has continued to surprise and shock the world by his humble living and colloquial way of speaking. His actions of kindness and compassion have inspired many. I highly recommend reading the encyclical that he and Pope Benedict wrote, Lumen Fidei, as well as Francis’ Apostolic Exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium. While some in the secular press have been negatively critical about the latter document, I recommend that you read it for yourself and do not depend on the secular media to digest it for you. It is an amazing exhortation to be more evangelical in living out and sharing our faith. It would make a wonderful new year’s resolution to get a copy and prayerfully read just a few pages each day. We will be reading it as part of our weekly staff meetings in the new year.

We live in amazing times. 2013 was full of wonderful outpourings of the Holy Spirit locally and globally. Please continue to ask God to pour out His Holy Spirit upon us. Pray that we will be, as a community, a beacon of faith, hope, and love to our civic community as well as to the larger global community.

Finally, I want to express my thanks to all of the parishioners of St. Anne’s, St. Patrick of the Forest, and Our Lady of the River for their faith-filled example to me. Serving you as your pastor has fed me deeply. Thank you, especially, for being patient with my mistakes and helping me get up when I have fallen. I give thanks for being here with you as we, together, journey on this path of faith.

Merry Christmas!

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

A Big Heart Open To God


Dear Parishioners,

In the past several weeks, a recent interview with Pope Francis has drawn enormous attention with headlines and reporting that lead Catholics to believe that we are about to abandon our sacred dogmas and moral teachings.  This is sad, but no surprise.  The media is notoriously bad at reporting Church news as well as the subtleties of philosophies, teachings, and even the structures of the Catholic Church.  So, what did the pope say?  Here’s one of his controversial statements and my reflection which I hope fills out what he meant:

“The dogmatic and moral teachings of the church are not all equivalent. The church’s pastoral ministry cannot be obsessed with the transmission of a disjointed multitude of doctrines to be imposed insistently.”

Some have interpreted this as the beginning of a “break” or “change” in the Church’s dogmas and moral teachings.  This is not correct nor a response that is new.  It is, however, a very serious challenge.  He further said that our proclamation must be missionary in style where love and compassion come first.  If we forget this, we as a Church will no longer be the “moral edifice” to the world, but a falling “house of cards, losing the freshness and fragrance of the Gospel.”  These are very dramatic images to be sure.  So what does all this mean? 

First, the pope was reminding us that some dogmas and moral teachings are more central than others.  For example, the belief in one triune God is more central than the reality that when either consecrated eucharistic species is divided, the whole Christ is present in each part of the species.  Both are dogmas, both are essential parts of our Faith, the former being at the center, the latter being definitively true yet not as central.  Committing murder and cheating on a test are both immoral. The former is more grave than the latter. 

Second, the pope wanted his audience to remember that we shouldn’t spread the Gospel by starting with dogmas and moral teachings.  Rather, the pope wants us to remember that the Gospel we are to proclaim starts with God’s love. 

We are to love God and our neighbor (cf. Matt 22:39).  That comes before all else.  It is a commandment.  We are to show to others that God is love.  Certainly, we hold true to moral living and need to teach it, but it is a consequence of the most fundamental and compelling part of the Good News.  Reading the Gospels makes it clear that Jesus did this very same thing.  Just imagine Jesus saying that the Good News was to not commit adultery?  How many followers would that inspire?  And while Jesus did teach against adultery, this was not the center of his mission.  And therein lies the pope’s point.  Jesus taught about the Kingdom of God and secondarily would also teach about the moral life. Recall the woman caught in the act of adultery whom the Pharisees wanted to stone (Jn. 8:1-11)?  How did Jesus react to the woman and in what order?  He listened, showed compassion, forgave her sins, and then told her to go and sin no more.  How did he react to those who were accusing?  He listened, stooped down to write, then challenged them to a self examination of conscience. Some who are rigidly focused on only the moral life, the Pope commented, have gotten the whole thing backwards.  I must admit that, at times, I have done this myself.  So, I take the pope’s words to heart.

When we meet someone who is living a life of serious sin, we must first proclaim that God loves them and desires to be in full communion with him.  We must begin with the person, not the sin.  We should let them know that we love them.  We should show authentic care and concern.  We should remind them that God’s love and forgiveness is available to them and that God’s love is bigger than our sins.  We should express the joy that comes from being close to God, his Church, and the Sacraments. We should, if the situation allows, invite them to walk with us or ask to accompany them in that journey of restoration.  Such a proclamation is more likely to draw someone to the heart of God.  Such a witness may woo one’s heart to burn for love of the truth.  With one’s heart now open to the wonders of God’s love, they may be more likely to reexamine their lifestyle, repent, and be further transformed into the person they were always called to be.  This is what the Pope was trying to say.  We need to evangelize and share the “saving love of God” and then we must catechize.  If we begin in the other direction, people are more likely to perceive us as simply a Church of rules and regulations and forget that the heart of the Bride, the Church, is focused on the heart of the Bridegroom, Jesus Christ.

Every now and then, we get this right.  For example, this past week, a pair of young adults entered our church without permission and began to shoot a music video.  Several persons who happened to be in the church were shocked and didn’t know what to do.  Rightfully so.  None of these people came at these young men with vicious indignation or self-righteousness.  That was a win for charity right off the bat.  Instead, I was asked to come over to talk to the men, and so I did. The music was in a modern rap style and the main artist was using our church interior as backdrop for his music video.  Clearly, it was inappropriate to do any kind of filming in our church without permission.  Furthermore, the potential contents of the video might have been at issue.  So, instead of accusing the young men, I honestly expressed my interest in their art, got to know them and their background, and then gently reminded them to call ahead for permission if they wanted to shoot any videos in the future.  As it turned out, the main artist was crafting a video with music that described his love for his mother who died when he was young, how he missed her, and how much inspiration he has drawn from her as she looks down from heaven on her son.  The young man shared with me a very troubled past.  I tried to empathize and encourage him in his journey.  Finally as they were leaving, I invited the main artist to return so we could talk some more about his struggles if he desired.  We parted in friendship with a promise for the link to his video when it is available online.  What church did this young man encounter?  I hope a compassionate one.  I hope it was a church that took interest in him as a person first before the rules. I hope this was a moment of success, a moment of compassion and not just an eviction from the church building by some angry Catholics.  I hope this is true.  I think it was.  Have I resolved similar situation in the past with such peace?  No.  So, the challenge remains out there for me and I hope you too.

With recent unprecedented socio-political developments in our country, we have been challenged more directly on moral fronts and have felt the need to respond.  Cardinal Dolan of New York and president of the USCCB would likely be the first to agree with the pope.  You might recall that at the beginning of the heated debates about the HHS Mandate, Cardinal Dolan was quoted saying, "We didn't start this battle, and I'm kind of uncomfortable with it... We'd much rather be conciliatory."  The heart of Cardinal Dolan is one about the mercy of God and care for the poor.  It was the disregard to our religious liberty which mandated we pay for so-called medical procedures that would kill the poor which compelled our bishops to speak out.  It is only when specific issues arise that our bishops step up and respond.  Archbishop Sample is very much like this.  In my own dealings with our archbishop, I could sense that he has the heart of a shepherd.   He has said that he will speak on issues when needed.  You see, being shepherds as our pope and bishops are, they desire to proclaim the Gospel first, love much, and correct little.  None of this changes dogma or the fundamental teachings of our faith.  But, the pope’s words remind us all of the challenge of charity.  He reminds us of the hierarchy of truths. He reminds us of the importance of the human person and the need to reach out with compassion.

Finally, I apologize for the length of this letter, but the pope’s reflections are important.  The two sentences that I have focused upon make up only 0.3% of his entire text.  I highly encourage all of you to read the entire interview.  He had a lot to share.  I think readers will get a deeper insight into the heart and thought of our new pope.  A link to to the entire text is available on our web site, stannechurch.com. 

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

Being Sheep


Dear Parishioners,

Last weekend I offered a homily on what it means to be the sheep of God’s flock. It is likewise hard to be a local shepherd at times as well. The good news is that we are all in this together, and we are not alone, for we have our Archbishop to help and guide us on our journey as a parish the local church called the Archdiocese of Portland.


In my homily, I reflected on the process of remodeling our Church building. But, I didn’t mention why a remodel was even needed. The reasons are many, but here are just some of the main ones. First and foremost, the particular approach to semi-round seating in our situation is problematic for liturgical celebrations, especially when a vast majority of people are seated to one side and hardly anyone sits in front of the altar. Most of the pews are not facing the altar, the main focus of any Catholic Church. Our lighting system is very inadequate. The acoustics render the spoken word hard to understand. The ability to use any kind of visual multimedia is extremely difficult (think, Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal video). The ability to celebrate baptisms, weddings, and funerals are a struggle liturgically. I imagine that many of you have your own thoughts that you might add to this list. Regardless, we need to implement a remodel to address these and other issues.

There are many many ways a Church can be built and or remodeled. There is no perfect or right way. Through the course of history, the Catholic Church has built many styles of Churches to the glory of God. I mentioned that I was aware that we have basically two paradigms from which to begin: augmenting the current semi-round approach we currently have or turning the entire focus in one direction facing the East or West side of our Church. Knowing that Archbishop Sample would ultimately have to approve our final design, I desired to ask him about the basic paradigm. So, two weeks ago I had that opportunity. He was very gracious and inquisitive about our project as well as the basic shape of our building. We had only a few minutes to chat, but he clearly desired that we choose the second of the two paradigms described above. In addition, he was clear that he desired that the tabernacle be placed directly behind the altar. He mentioned that, in particular with regard to the tabernacle placement, this would simply solve a lot of issues, a thought with which I agree.

I readily admit that I like modern architectural designs of many Catholic Churches, and I like Church arrangements in the semi- round approach. However, I also see many benefits of other designs too, including ones with the paradigm for which we will be striving. It is important to remember that the architecture of a Church, while important, isn’t the wholeness of what it means to be Church. If you find yourself saddened by this potential change, I want to encourage you to know that new and great things can come from this other approach. If you have always hoped that a remodel would be done in the forthcoming style, I ask that you be compassionate to those who have to die a little to the vision of Church that they have come to love. Most important is our sense of unity and communion with each other, our Archbishop, and most of all our Lord Jesus. Do not let this process become a moment for despair or arrogance, but rather for joy... joy for the new things that God is planning in our midst.

It is hard to be a sheep, following as a flock, together with one’s shepherd. I promise to continue to shepherd us all with clarity and transparency. In the months and years ahead, as we continue in this plan, there will be a feasibility study, potential listening sessions, input from various groups, a committee to help in the renovation, a capital campaign, discussions with our contractor and architect, and consistent communication with those at the Archdiocese as needed. I have already received people’s thoughts and desires about what they hope will happen, for which I am open. But, remember that this process may not necessarily please everyone, nor necessarily fulfill one’s personal demands. In that situation, please guard your hearts from the temptation of pride and arrogance that can cause dissension in these kinds of works. I will not be receptive to those who are demanding, lack charity, or will give with “strings attached.” This process will involve people with stewards’ hearts, people who are willing to give with faith and generosity, people who are willing to serve with regard to the common good and not themselves. As far as exacting details, I do not have any more than I have offered here as I write this letter. In this process, it is my personal goal that it will bring us together as one community, striving to remodel our Church to give God the glory, not ourselves. I am excited about the possibilities, and I ask you to pray for me, your local shepherd, as we begin the initial phases of dreaming and planning. May we be a light to all those with whom we work with and talk to in regards to this project.

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor