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New Roman Missal

Much Ado About Something

Dear Parishioners

New Roman Missal

Well, we did it! We successfully transitioned to the new Roman Missal. Yes, there were goofs and gaffs, and they will continue. But, overall, I think everyone did pretty good with their parts. Please continue to offer up a pray for us priests for whom the bulk of changes effects. Also, please give us an indulgence of patience when we make mistakes too. It will take some time to imprint the new translation in our hearts and minds to the point that we don’t have to be glued to the book.

Immaculate Conception

This coming Thursday is the solemnity of the Immaculate Conception. Please make an effort to mark your calendars so that you may not miss this important celebration of the Church. I goofed up the time for the morning Mass on our published liturgy schedule. The times should read: 8:30 AM, 12:05 PM, and 7 PM. The morning Mass will include our school children while the evening Mass will be bilingual.

Adoration Chapel

As you should already know, we changed the entrance code to the Adoration Chapel due to some serious security breaches. I implore you not to give out the new code to anyone you do not know. If you are one the persons who enjoy dropping in at the chapel at your convenience and do not have a scheduled adoration time, you must first come to the office during office hours to get the new code. In addition, for those using the chapel after hours, if you have the habit of using the restroom just prior to your time in adoration, please let the current adorer know that you are there and will be right back. It should be considered suspicious activity if someone opens the outside door of the adoration chapel and does not come in to the chapel soon if not immediately. Thank you all for your understanding. Having a 24-7 Adoration Chapel is certainly a gift to us all. Let us all do our part to make sure we can maintain its existence by maintaining security protocols.

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

New Roman Missal Preparation

Dear Parishioners,

This month we begin in earnest to learn and practice parts of the new Roman Missal so that by the first weekend of Advent (Nov. 26/27) we will officially implement the entire Roman Missal at all our Masses and Churches.

With the new translation coming to our communities, we priest feel that it is a fantastic opportunity to teach the faithful about the Mass. We will take the time normally reserved for the homily to teach about the theology and praxis (think liturgical gestures and behaviors), the new actual new responses and other changes due to the new Roman Missal, and allow the music groups to teach the musical arrangements using the new translation. The U.S. Bishops have allowed parishes to begin implementing the musical settings beginning in September which means if you travel around the country, various parishes will be at different stages of learning and implementation. No worries.

For our part, you should notice that the new music books are already in place (a month earlier than normal) and a laminated pew card with the common responses in the new translation will be in the pews as well to help you. When Advent comes, the missalettes will be changed out, and we should be ready to go.

I highly recommend that if you want to learn more about the new Roman Missal that you go to my web site, mysteriesofthemass.com, on your computer to listen to talks and discussions from Fr. Jeremy Driscoll, O.S.B., a monk and priest of Mount Angel Abbey and a member of the Vox Clara Committee who was instrumental in the actual job of translating the texts from the Latin.

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

More on the New Roman Missal

Dear Parishioners,

This past week, Fr. Dominic and I joined the rest of the priests of the Archdiocese for our annual Priest Convocation in Newport. While there we had the opportunity to, once again, listen to Fr. Jeremy Driscoll, O.S.B. a priest and monk of Mount Angel Abbey. Fr. Jeremy is part of the Vox Clara Committee who was directly involved in the new translation of the Roman Missal, also known as the Sacramentary. This is the big red book that the priest uses to proclaim the prayers of the Mass. In his talk, Fr. Jeremy discussed the basic principles of the translation and walked through thethird Eucharistic Prayer as well as answered questions from the priests.

It is important that we all study and become familiar with the Sacred Liturgy of the Mass and the upcoming new translation. As such, I will be offering another Catholicism 101 on the new Roman Missal which will take place this month on the 23rd between the Sunday Masses. In addition, we are putting special inserts about the new missal and the translation for your further study.

If you would like to listen to Fr. Jeremy's talks, you can go to www.mysteriesofthemass,com or subscribe via iTunes by searching for my last name or "mysteries of the mass" in the search bar. Also, I will make available some CD for check out at the office.

I am very excited about this upcoming change. It will be like hearing the Mass anew yet old. I also ask for your prayers for all us priests who will bear the greatest burden of making sure we offer the Mass in this new translation in a way that maintains its beauty and dignity. Please forgive us when we mess up because the previous wording is so ingrained in our memories. Until then, may the Lord be with you...

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger

New Roman Missal


Dear Parishioners,

I hope that your summer plans and events have been life-giving a re-creating of your body and soul. While our local temperatures have been lower than normal, I cannot complain that we haven’t hit any triple digit temperatures.

In the past several weeks, we have been making plans to prepare for the new Roman Missal. The Roman Missal is the big red book that the priest uses to celebrate Mass. This is different than the Lectionary, another big red book which contains the Scripture readings for Mass. With the new Roman Missal coming, it is important to prepare for its implementation. So, I’ve met with our priests and discussed plans with our Liturgy Committee about how to go about teaching everyone what, why, and how we will bring these changes to our community.

In October, I will offer a workshop that will describe, in depth, the rationale for the new Missal as well as offer many examples of the changes so people can get a good sense of how it will differ from what we hear today at Mass. The changes are not just for our area nor just for the United States. The changes are for all English-speaking countries. Please keep your eye peeled to the bulletin as well as announcements at Mass for locations, dates, and times.

In addition to this workshop, all our churches during November will pause from the normal preaching of the homily in order to allow for catechesis to take place on the changes as well as overall education about the Mass. In order to maintain continuity, each of the priests will be scheduled at the same location during the first three weeks of November. Here’s the schedule:

1st weekend of November: Reasons and philosophy for a new translation of the English Roman Missal and teaching of a musical setting for the Mass Parts.
2nd weekend in November: Catechesis on the Opening Rites and the Liturgy of the Word
3rd weekend in November: Catechesis on the Liturgy of the Eucharist and the Concluding Rites.
4th weekend in November: Total implementation of the new Roman Missal as directed by the Church.

I realize that any change is difficult for so many. That is why I am writing today, over two months in advance of this process. In my own preparation for this change, I have found that the Mass is more alive and the texts are more articulate of the mysteries we celebrate. I believe it will be a renewal for me, personally, and I hope that the same will be true for you.

If you have any questions or comments for me, please don’t hesitate to approach me and ask.

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor

Two Things

Dear Parishioners,

Last week I offered two different presentation. The first was on the new Roman Missal. The second was on Pope John Paul’s Theology of the Body. I’d like to offer a couple thoughts about those topics.

First, the new Roman Missal. Maybe you are aware, but then maybe not. So, it is important to know that the prayers and texts we use during Mass (not including the scripture readings) are going to be changing a bit. In 2001, the Church published a document, Liturgiam Authenticam, which spelled out new guidelines for translating liturgical texts. One of those guidelines called for a more literal translation from the original Latin. As it turns out, our English translation of our Sacramentary is not a literal, but a more more loose translation, specifically called a “dynamic equivalence” translation, from the Latin original. Other major language groups are more literal, and therefore are in the great need, as we are, to have our liturgical books revised. Another issue is that many smaller language groups use our English translation to derive their own. So, by the time they have their books translated, there is a real potential of being quite removed from the original Latin. So, a new translation has been created after much discussion and debate, and we will begin using that new translation at the beginning of this coming Advent. You can learn what is changing by visiting the U.S. Bishop’s web site (www.usccb.org/romanmissal). In addition, I will hold a repeat reflection (date TBA) about the new missal. You can also visit one of my web sites (www.mysteriesofthemass.com) and listen to Fr. Jeremy Driscoll, OSB who was one of the translators. Finally, in the weeks just prior to the change, we will be taking out special time in our homilies to explain, review, practice, and learn the new parts that you will need to say.

Secondly, I want to thank all the adults, parishioners, and parents who supported our five week journey through the Theology of the Body series during our Youth Ministry nights. We spent five weeks in a row, yes even including Superbowl Sunday, learning and discussing the meaning of our bodies in light of Pope John Paul’s catechetical program of sex and marriage. A week prior to that, I offered an adult crash course so that parents, engaged couples, and anyone else could learn the basics for their own lives. I pray that the things we talked about will be seminal points of reference for all who attended these important workshops. Your support and prayers made the entire experience a huge success. If you want to learn more on your own, visit www.christopherwest.com and you can order a variety of media right from the web site.

Blessings,

Fr. William Holtzinger
Pastor